ASA-2019-00406 – VMware: Selective Acknowledgement (SACK) Panic

A sequence of SACKs may be crafted such that one can trigger an integer overflow, leading to a kernel panic.  A malicious actor must have network access to an affected system including the ability to send traffic with low MSS values to the target. Successful exploitation of these issues may cause the target system to crash or significantly degrade performance.

ASA-2019-00365 – Linux kernel: Integer overflow while processing SACK blocks allows remote denial of service (SACK Panic)

An integer overflow flaw was found in the way the Linux kernel's networking subsystem processed TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACK) segments. While processing SACK segments, the Linux kernel's socket buffer (SKB) data structure becomes fragmented. Each fragment is about TCP maximum segment size (MSS) bytes. To efficiently process SACK blocks, the Linux kernel merges multiple fragmented SKBs into one, potentially overflowing the variable holding the number of segments. A remote attacker could use this flaw to crash the Linux kernel by sending a crafted sequence of SACK segments on a TCP connection with small value of TCP MSS, resulting in a denial of service (DoS).