ASA-2019-00510 – FreeBSD bhyve: Insufficient validation of guest-supplied data (e1000 device)

The e1000 network adapters permit a variety of modifications to an Ethernet packet when it is being transmitted. These include the insertion of IP and TCP checksums, insertion of an Ethernet VLAN header, and TCP segmentation offload ("TSO"). The e1000 device model uses an on-stack buffer to generate the modified packet header when simulating these modifications on transmitted packets. When TCP segmentation offload is requested for a transmitted packet, the e1000 device model used a guest-provided value to determine the size of the on-stack buffer without validation. The subsequent header generation could overflow an incorrectly sized buffer or indirect a pointer composed of stack garbage. A misbehaving bhyve guest could overwrite memory in the bhyve process on the host.

ASA-2019-00509 – FreeBSD: Insufficient message length validation in bsnmp library

A function extracting the length from type-length-value encoding is not properly validating the submitted length. A remote user could cause, for example, an out-of-bounds read, decoding of unrelated data, or trigger a crash of the software such as bsnmpd resulting in a denial of service.

ASA-2019-00508 – FreeBSD: ICMPv6 / MLDv2 out-of-bounds memory access

The ICMPv6 input path incorrectly handles cases where an MLDv2 listener query packet is internally fragmented across multiple mbufs. A remote attacker may be able to cause an out-of-bounds read or write that may cause the kernel to attempt to access an unmapped page and subsequently panic.

ASA-2019-00507 – FreeBSD: Multiple vulnerabilities in bzip2

The decompressor used in bzip2 contains a bug which can lead to an out-of-bounds write when processing a specially crafted bzip2(1) file. bzip2recover contains a heap use-after-free bug which can be triggered when processing a specially crafted bzip2(1) file. An attacker who can cause maliciously crafted input to be processed may trigger either of these bugs. The bzip2recover bug may cause a crash, permitting a denial-of-service. The bzip2 decompressor bug could potentially be exploited to execute arbitrary code. Note that some utilities, including the tar(1) archiver and the bspatch(1) binary patching utility (used in portsnap(8) and freebsd-update(8)) decompress bzip2(1)-compressed data internally; system administrators should assume that their systems will at some point decompress bzip2(1)-compressed data even if they never explicitly invoke the bunzip2(1) utility.

ASA-2019-00506 – Wind River VxWorks: TCP Urgent Pointer = 0 leads to integer underflow

A specially crafted TCP-segment with the URG-flag set may cause overflow of the buffer passed to recv(), recvfrom() or recvmsg() socket routines. With a prerequisite that the system uses TCP sockets, an attacker can either hijack an existing TCP session and inject bad TCP segments, or establish a new TCP session on any TCP port the victim system listens to. The impact of the vulnerability is a buffer overflow of up to a full TCP receive-windows (by default 10k-64k depending on the version). The buffer overflow happens in the task calling recv()/recvfrom()/recvmsg(). Applications that pass a buffer equal to or larger than a full TCP window are not susceptible to this attack. Applications passing a stack-allocated variable as buffer are the easiest to exploit. The most likely outcome is a crash of the application reading from the affected socket. In the worst-case scenario, this vulnerability can potentially lead to RCE.